The Sacrifice of Warm Showers and Clean Sheets: On the way to Amed, Bali

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Yes, you read that right. I had little idea of what I was getting myself into and no idea it was going to be a camping adventure until I got there, but it was worth its weight in gold for the life experience. My friend joined me in Uluwatu and we made the trek to Amed to experience a different side of Bali. But first we had a good size list of things we wanted to do while on the way there. The drive was several hours so we made sure to enjoy the treasures Bali had along the way.

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Bali is known for a few things, one of them being silver. Some of their silver is high quality, at a good price, and the craftsmanship to make their Balinese style jewelry is unmatched. There is so much silver being sold in Bali that it is worth your while to take the time and ask around to verify that where you are planning on buying yours is high quality. A lot of the not so high quality silver has a higher mix of iron in it and much of it is sold at higher prices in the areas with higher tourist traffic. We asked around a bit and decided to stop at a silver shop outside of any main city where we were able watch the silversmith make the jewelry. I don’t normally purchase jewelry for myself but on this occasion, I did a little splurging.

Another art and craft Bali is known for is Batik. Batik is a technique of wax resistant painting. And this of course was another must on our stop and see list. To watch these women painting intricate patterns with such ease and grace on usually silk and cotton fabric was astounding. It is truly a talent and an art. Many of the pieces they are painting on are worn for special occasions in Balinese culture and a good quality batik silk dresses or saris are a bit expensive. It does make for a beautiful dress or long skirt.

Onto temples and the prettiest most intriguing water palace I’ve seen to date. There are so many temples in Bali; it really does seem that there is a temple on every corner the way there is a Starbucks on every corner of Seattle. Through talking with a few newly made local friends in Bali I was told there are three temples in each village. This makes for over a thousand temples on the island of Bali alone. Each temple has its own meaning; one is to represent creation, one is for daily maintenance of health, luck, life, etc., and the third is for destruction or “the destroyer”. The village cemetery is also always by the temple that represents destruction. Disclaimer: I do not claim fully understand Balinese Hindu; I am merely just regurgitating for you what I was told. I may in the near future write a blog on all I learned about Balinese Hindu which is different from Indian Hindu and why Bali is the only island left in Indonesia that is predominantly Hindu. That being said I have seen so many temples. The water temple is one worth taking the time to visit.

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We didn’t arrive to Amed until well after dark and the street, if you can call it that was windy, narrow, and very broken. When our taxi stopped at our stay I thought “Is he sure this is the right place?” We were escorted back to these cabins on stilts. I couldn’t see much because it was so dark outside and there weren’t any lights along the path. There was just a faint glimmer of lights coming from other cabins. “Oh, good there is electricity!” I thought. We walked up ladder like steps into a cabin. The man escorting us turned on a light. There was one light, I think one electrical socket, with a mattress on the ground and a ladder to a loft with another mattress on the ground of the loft floor. I’m thankful for the mosquito nets provided over the beds. The man left and my friend looked at me and asked, “Are you okay?” I could tell she was wondering if she was okay as well. We both just looked at each other realizing we both smelled the not so good aroma coming from the mattresses and whatever was under our cabin. We opened the back door of the cabin that put us back outside and there was another small light. We flipped the switch and saw the hose fastened to a concrete wall that was our shower and a toilet that was less than clean looking. I looked at my friend and just said “We’re camping.” She replied, “that’s what I was telling myself too.” “We just have to tell ourselves we are camping and then it’s not so bad.” I said back to her. We both smiled and laughed.

 

In Amed I slept in and wore the same clothes with a swim suit for 3 days because I refused to let anything else I owned touch the mattress. I just couldn’t pinpoint what was in or on the mattress that was creating that smell and I wanted to subject as little as I could to it. And I got fairly clean feeling under the cold-water hose of a shower. I still however enjoyed the rustic and serenely beautiful landscape of this area. When we awoke the next morning, walking down the ladder-like steps, we were greeted by the calm ocean waters just feet from our doorstep. The few days we spent there were a good switch from where we were. We walked up and down roads and small paths that led to fresh spring water and rice fields along with other crops to be harvested. We snorkeled and saw a completely different ocean than the one I am used to in Hawaii. And my most memorable moment was capturing the small glimpses of an entire community coming together to prepare and build for a Balinese wedding that was soon coming. If you follow my Instagram you may have seen these stories. There were men building archways and women and children all helping. I thought they were building homes until I asked and was told the whole village comes together to prepare for these extravagant celebrations. Amed was worth the trek, just choose you accommodations carefully.

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